Spring beauty

The woods are yielding the first flowers of spring. These wildflowers bloom fleetingly, before the trees leaf out, while the sunshine can still reach the forest floor.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria Canadensis) is becoming more plentiful. I’ve seen patches along several Piedmont trails.

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

bloodroot stand

The blooms of Dutchman’s Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria ), tinted green when they first emerged, have brightened to a crisp white.

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

This delicate flower is a Toothwort, most likely a Cutleaf Toothwort (Dentaria laciniata), native to both Maryland’s Piedmont and Coastal Plain.

Toothwort

Toothwort

And, at last, Spring Beauty (Claytonia virginica).

Spring Beauty

Spring Beauty

Mayapple, Showy orchis and Trillium have broken ground (see Mayapple foliage to the left of the Spring Beauty) and will be flowering soon!

A word about invasive plants:  While searching out and photographing these native wildflowers, on this visit I made it a point to pull at least one invasive plant for each photo taken. I pulled a lot of garlic mustard! (As a trained Weed Warrior, I’m authorized to remove it from park land.) Garlic mustard not only crowds out wildflowers but also releases a chemical that interferes with the all-important fungus that trees and plants use to process nutrients through their roots. If you find garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) in your yard, pull it to help contain its spread.

Invasive garlic mustard

Invasive garlic mustard

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Early spring blossoms

With spring running late this year, the first woodland wildflowers are a welcome sight. Here are two that are hard to spot.

The elegant Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) is named for the red juice in its roots. The plant has been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years.

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

Dutchman’s Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria) is a relative of bleeding heart.

Dutchman's breeches

Dutchman’s breeches

Trees are starting to flower too. The buds of native flowering dogwood trees (Cornus florida) are beginning to open.

Flowering dogwood

Flowering dogwood

The Maple tree’s blossom is easily overlooked but has a delicate beauty.

Maple tree floret

Maple florets

Spring has sprung!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sights of spring

Signs of spring are appearing every day in the Piedmont.

Tree swallows have returned to nest in the meadow after wintering in Florida and points south.

Tree swallows eyeing nestboxes

Tree swallows eyeing nestboxes

Rabbits are nibbling fresh growth.

Eastern cottontail holding very still

Eastern cottontail holding very still

The tiny Northern Brownsnake has reclaimed its favorite spot in the garden since emerging from hibernation.

Northern brownsnake warms itself in the sunshine

Northern brownsnake warms itself in the sunshine

The earliest native bloom in the Piedmont — skunk cabbage, a relative of Jack-in-the-pulpit — delights naturalists (and few others).

Skunk cabbage in flower

Skunk cabbage in flower

The first violets are unfolding.

Common violet

Common violet

The bees are back!

Honeybee on crocus

Honeybee on crocus

Goldfinch males molt to regain their vibrant breeding plumage.

American goldfinch

American goldfinch

And Robins are everywhere.

American robin

American robin

Happy spring!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sounds of spring

It’s a late spring in Maryland’s Piedmont. But it’s beginning to sound like spring.

Nothing much to see in this post, just to hear. Sound quality is uneven, so you’ll need to adjust your volume. Each link will take you to a separate YouTube page.
TIP: Close the YouTube link immediately after each clip or you’ll hear a noisy YouTube video.

On a sunny mid-March morning, this woodpecker — I think a Downy, too far away to be sure — drummed high on a maple tree. Woodpeckers drum to establish territory and impress prospective mates. In contrast, songbirds sing. Click here to listen (11 seconds).

Visit the little wetland at Oregon Ridge Park for the next three sounds of spring.

Click here to listen to Red-winged Blackbirds, which have returned to the marshy area to breed (13 seconds).

Wood Frogs made their presence known on one of our rare warm late-March afternoons. Click here to listen (32 seconds). No surprise that many park visitors think they are hearing ducks.

Finally, on a cold, windy afternoon, a few hardy Spring Peepers sang their song. Not a chorus, but it’s a start. Click here to listen (37 seconds).

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Assateague last day of winter

March 19 was cold and windy on Assateague Island. Songbirds, shorebirds, wading birds and raptors were largely out of sight, lying low before Spring arrived the next day with a hard, slushy rain. But there is always something to see.

Horned Grebe in winter plumage

Horned Grebe in winter plumage

Two Horned Grebes in their winter plumage fed on the bayside. They are diving ducks and strong underwater swimmers. It’s hard to catch a photo because you never know where they will pop up after a long dive. I hope their feeding is successful because they will soon be migrating to their breeding grounds in central and northwest Canada and Alaska.

Great Blue Heron tracks

Great Blue Heron tracks

There were signs that a Great Blue Heron had been foraging in the flats since the last high tide. Those are some big feet!

Assateague pony band

Assateague pony band

The wild ponies were abundant on the beachside and bayside. With very few people in the park, the ponies meandered easily across the road. This year’s harsh weather was rough on the ponies, with reportedly three in their 20s succumbing to old age this winter. Good long lives for wild ponies.

And a sign of spring! This male Osprey has claimed a perennial nesting spot since returning from its wintering ground, probably in Venezuela. The females arrive a little later, so he’s waiting for his mate to make the journey back to Assateague.

Osprey claiming nesting spot

Osprey claiming nesting spot

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tough as a titmouse

Look up at an abandoned wasp nest and you might spy a Tufted Titmouse feasting.

Tufted titmouse with a morsel plucked from old wasp nest

Tufted titmouse with a morsel plucked from old wasp nest

During the summer, titmice eat a variety of adult and larval insects, including wasps and stinkbugs (yay!). Insects are still in short supply in a cold March. Since only the female wasps that are queens-to-be survive the winter, I’m unsure what this titmouse found in last year’s wasp nest. And my camera wasn’t sharp enough to capture a close-up of the bird’s meal, but it looks like desiccated wasp. (Double click on photos to enlarge.) Perhaps some other insects had adopted the nest.

TUTI wasp5

Here’s what first caught my eye. Spot the titmouse foraging at the base of the wasp nest.

TUTI foraging on wasp nest

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Great Backyard Bird Count

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

This weekend marked the annual Great Backyard Bird Count (http://gbbc.birdcount.org/), when birders from around the globe report their observations to a data base compiled by Cornell University. With squirrels laying low during the current deep freeze, birds made the most of the high-energy suet and seeds at Elev. 401’s backyard feeders.

A pair of Red-bellied Woodpeckers. Note the male’s showy red cap and the female’s subtler crown.

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker

A pair of Downy Woodpeckers too. Elev. 401 needs a woodpecker nest box.

Female Downy Woodpecker

Female Downy Woodpecker

Male Downy Woodpecker

Male Downy Woodpecker

Chickadees and many other birds must crack open seed against a branch. Watch them at a feeder: pluck, fly to a nearby branch, crack, eat, repeat.

Chickadee

Chickadee

In contrast, cardinals crack open seeds with perfectly adapted beaks.

Northern Cardinal opens sunflower seeds

Northern Cardinal shows how to open sunflower seed…

...and safflower seed

…and safflower seed

Other familiar birds.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch in familiar pose

White-breasted Nuthatch

Junco -- possibly slate morph

Dark-eyed Junco — possibly slate-colored group — announces snow’s in the forecast

And a mystery guest. The markings and coloring suggest American Goldfinch in winter plumage, but the beak is too long and narrow for a finch. It’s a very small bird. Can anyone ID this visitor?

Update: It’s a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Tiny and fast-moving. Either a female or a male characteristically hiding its red crown. Always fun to spot a new bird.

Mystery bird

Mystery solved! Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Mystery bird needs ID

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Birding in Key West

Beaches, wetlands and year-round warm weather make for wonderful birding in Key West.

Great Blue Heron snoozes in the morning sunshine

No photos to share of Great White Herons this year — the Keys-only relative of the Great Blue. But the Great Blue Herons were stunning. I caught this one from a couple angles.

In full sun

Seen in full sun

Encountered first along the bike trail

Encountered first along the bike trail

Another GBH sunning on the wall of an old fort

Another GBH sunning nearby on the wall of an old fort

Little Green Herons too. They are getting tame.

Green heron

Green heron

Green heron pair on alert

Green heron pair on alert

Ospreys that breed in Maryland winter in Venezuela and other parts of Central and South America. Ospreys in the Keys are year-round residents. I spotted several active nests with hungry young.

Annoyed osprey

Annoyed osprey’s hunt interrupted by bicyclist with camera

I’m unsure of the identity of this hawk. It might be a juvenile of a Florida subspecies of Red-shouldered Hawk. Juveniles. Subspecies. It gets complicated.

In search of an ID. Juvenile FL subspecies Red-shouldered Hawk, perhaps?

Raptor in search of an ID. Juvenile FL subspecies Red-shouldered Hawk, perhaps?

Swimmers and bobbers.

Pied-billed Grebe

Pied-billed Grebe

Spotted Sandpiper incognito in its winter plumage

Spotted Sandpiper incognito in its winter plumage

And finally.

Brown pelican

Brown pelican unperturbed

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

That’s why it’s called a red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

It’s usually its bright red cap or black and white barred back that catches the eye, but the Red-bellied Woodpecker does indeed have a smudge of red on its breast and belly. The red patches are typically concealed by surrounding pale feathers, so it was a stroke of luck to capture in this photo the subtle marking that gives this woodpecker its name.

This bird is not to be confused with the less common Red-headed Woodpecker, which has exactly that — a fully red head and face. The Red-bellied was named in an era when birds were “taken” for study, so it was sometimes understated differences between species, not obvious field marks, that gave them their common names. (Try to spot the ringed-neck on the Ringed-neck Duck.)

Fun fact: Woodpeckers’ claws form an X to enable them to easily cling and travel up, down and around tree trunks and limbs.

Clinging with powerful woodpecker feet

Clinging with powerful woodpecker feet

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

A little snow

 

Cardinals, nuthatches, woodpeckers, titmice, chickadees, juncos, blue jays, finches and more loaded up on sunflower seeds and suet, and took shelter from today’s snow in the shrubs outside the kitchen window. Very convenient for me and my camera.

Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

Cardinal female

Cardinal female

White-breasted nuthatch in a familiar pose

White-breasted nuthatch in a familiar pose

Cardinal male

Cardinal male

Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

Red-bellied woodpecker. Is the bird too big or the feeder too small?

Red-bellied woodpecker. Is the bird too big or the feeder too small?

After the snow stopped, a visit to the garden to admire the native plants in the snow.

Golden Alexander

Golden Alexander

Bee balm

Bee balm

Mountain mint

Mountain mint

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments